Tired of condoms?
Worried about HIV?
Want to help end AIDS?

Have you heard of PrEP (Pre-exposure prophylaxis) or PEP (Post-exposure prophylaxis)?
An HIV prevention pill is giving New Yorkers a new way to protect ourselves. Help design a new information campaign to get the word out.

Learn more and sign up for a focus group:

FRIDAY, July 11th
5pm to 7pm
BOOM! Health
Harm Reduction Center
226 East 144th Street
Bronx, NY 10451

TUESDAY, July 15th
2pm to 4pm
SPENCER COX CENTER
230 West 17th Street
8th Floor Conference Room
New York, NY, 10011

ALL PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE A $15 GIFT CARD TO SUBWAY RESTAURANTS + a TWO-RIDE METRO CARD!
AND, FOOD WILL BE SERVED!

RSVP:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QSZ9F26
or
Call Email: Jeremiah Johnson, +1 212 253.7922, Jeremiah.Johnson@treatmentactiongroup.org


Brought to you by TAG: Treatment Action Group, an independent AIDS research and policy think tank fighting for better treatment, a vaccine, and a cure for AIDS. TAG works to ensure that all people with HIV receive lifesaving treatment, care, and information.

MORE ABOUT PrEP and PEP:

Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a way for people who do not have HIV but who are at substantial risk of getting it to prevent HIV infection by taking a pill every day. The pill (brand name Truvada) contains two medicines (tenofovir and emtricitabine) that are used in combination with other medicines to treat HIV. When someone is exposed to HIV through sex or injection drug use, these medicines can work to keep the virus from establishing a permanent infection.

When taken consistently, PrEP has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in people who are at high risk by up to 92%. PrEP is much less effective if it is not taken consistently.

PrEP is a powerful HIV prevention tool and can be combined with condoms and other prevention methods to provide even greater protection than when used alone. But people who use PrEP must commit to taking the drug every day and seeing their health care provider for follow-up every 3 months. More info.

Post-exposure prophylaxis, or PEP, is the use of antiretroviral drugs after a single high-risk event to stop HIV from making copies of itself and spreading through your body. PEP must be started as soon as possible to be effective—and always within 3 days of a possible exposure. If you think you may have been exposed to HIV very recently, see a doctor as soon as possible to find out if PEP is right for you.